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Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences

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Pyogenic granuloma

Contributor: David A. Ramirez, MD; Heather A. Stiff, MD; Mark A. Greiner, MD

Photographer: Jody Troyer, CRA

Category: Cornea/External Eye Disease

Posted September 17, 2019

A pyogenic granuloma is characterized as a pedunculated vascular lesion, and appears as a fleshy red or pink mass. It is often located on the eyelid and bleeds easily with minimal contact. Clinically, it arises with rapid growth in an area of previous trauma, surgery, or inflammation. Histologically, it is composed of granulation tissue, capillaries, and non-granulomatous inflammatory cells [1 ,2]. Recommended treatment is excision of the lesion at it's base.

Slit lamp photograph of the left eye shows a nasal bulbar pyogenic granuloma with surrounding conjunctival injection.

Figure 1. Slit lamp photograph of the left eye shows a nasal bulbar pyogenic granuloma with surrounding conjunctival injection. Pathology showed that underlying changes were consistent with pterygium or pingueculum. The overlying area of acute hemorrhage and fibrosis was thought to be due to digital trauma from rubbing.

Reference(s):

  1. Mannis MJ, Holland, Edward J. Cornea; Fundamentals, Diagnosis, and Management. Fourth ed: Elsevier, 2017.
  2. Neff A, Chahal H, Carter KD. Benign Eyelid Lesions Ophthalmology. Fifth ed: Elsevier 2019.

Contributor:  Jesse Vislisel, MD

Photographer:  Antoinette Venckus, CRA

Category:  Cornea/external

Posted August 18, 2015

Pyogenic granulomas are formed when there is abnormally vigorous proliferation of granulation tissue. They appear as vascular growths with smooth surfaces, usually at the site of previous ocular surgery.  

The patient in these photographs developed this lesion after undergoing a scleral buckle procedure for the repair of a retinal detachment. The growth was later excised and pathology findings were consistent with pyogenic granulomaThe patient in these photographs developed this lesion after undergoing a scleral buckle procedure for the repair of a retinal detachment. The growth was later excised and pathology findings were consistent with pyogenic granuloma

Figure 1: The patient in these photographs developed this lesion after undergoing a scleral buckle procedure for the repair of a retinal detachment.  The growth was later excised and pathology findings were consistent with pyogenic granuloma.


Pyogenic granuloma

Contributor:  Tressa Larson, OD, FAAO

Photographer:  Mark Greiner, MD

Category:  Cornea/external

pyogenic granuloma in a patient who had previously had punctal plugs

pyogenic granuloma in a patient who had previously had punctal plugs

Figure 2: These photos are from a patient who had previously had intracanalicular punctal plugs.


Pyogenic granuloma

Contributor: Robert B. Dinn, MD and Jordan M. Graff, MD, University of Iowa

February 8, 2008

Pyogenic granuloma
(higher resolution not available)

Figure 3: This lesion occurred a few months after undergoing canalicular repair. The lesion was surgically excised and the pathology specimen showed extensive granulation tissue with parenchymal hemorrhage.


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last updated: 09/18/2019
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